Scrumbaiting

There has been some vigorous discourse about the state of scrum in the past few months. I’m not going to refer to them specifically.

What it feels like is that scrum has reached a level of acceptance and recognition that it has now become mainstream enough to warrant the kinds of attacks that can build your reputation. Everyone loves the little guy; this is why it is useful to frame arguments as a battle between the little guy and the big guy. The insight to take away from this is that rising to the bait will only encourage more baiting. There is no right way to do this.

At the moment I feel a bit like scrum’s bulldog.

I think Martin Fowler probably has the right insight. The baiting, criticisms and misunderstandings will be an inevitable aspect of the growth of scrum. what we as a community need to do is emphasise the technical aspects of a scrum implementation that will ensure success.

Nothing succeeds like success; which means that in order to be successful, we need to do more with regard to practices like continuous integration, automated regression testing and test driven development and refactoring (especially in the architecture area).

The one area where I will usually reply to percieved criticisms is where I think it is founded on a misunderstanding of a practise or role.